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“Gay” A Media Phenomenon? July 27, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Enertainment, Gay Celebrities.
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In the past decade, we have seen the rise in shows that are based on gay characters’ not to mention a jump in the number of LGBT movies, such as Brokeback Mountain and Trans America. So what makes gay so appealing to the media world?

Take one of the most popular GLBT shows, Queer as Folk. Showtime took a real big risk airing this show – you’d think the Southern Baptist Convention would sued them! Suprisingly, it became Showtime’s most popular show of all time. This subsequently made millions in ad revenue for Showtime, to which the show ran for 5 seasons. I think people are starting to see there is a large market for LGBT content.

HBO even jumped on the bandwagon with their hit show, the L Word. Don’t forget HBO is a pay service and does not run off of ad revenue – this leads one to believe HBO saw an audience for such content. And the audiences are not all gay; many heterosexuals find these shows intriguing as their gay and lesbian counterparts.

As for movies, gay was the new black at this year’s Oscars. Both Brokeback Mountain and Trans America walked away with major awards. Boxofficmojo.com reports that Brokeback Mountain raked in a whopping $178,043,761 worldwide. While Trans America, a smaller production, still made an outstanding $13,350,369 worldwide.

There’s also the increasing number of publicy gay actors. Just to name a few: Ellen Degeneres, Rosie O’Donnell, N’Sync’s newly out Lance Bass; and those just dieing to get out of the closet: Clay Aiken, Oprah, and George W. Bush (haha).

From all the media buzz, it is quite clear to see that media outlets are recognizing that there is a big audience for LGBT media, which equals big bucks. No longer are we in the days of the Southern Baptist Convention and the like pressuring the entertainment industry to not do “gay”. Now gay is in, and everybody is watching.

 

*This post was written by Ryan Newman

Iran Executions July 26, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Gay Rights, Human Rights.
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This post is from Wayne Besen’s website. Here it is in its entirity:

Read this article


There is an excellent article in today’s Washington Post [July 20, 2006] that discusses the horrifying deaths of two gay boyfriends in the barbaric state of Iran. It also touches on the sad fact that most of the mainstream media ignored this tragedy, as if two dead gay teens mean nothing. It is the same media silence I got when I informed the press in 2003 that Jerry Falwell’s HIV+ “ex-gay” spokesman was engaged in unprotected orgies with men he met online. Again, the lives of gay men were considered not worthy of media coverage.

The Sodom Mobile July 23, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Uncategorized.
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Now for this HILARIOUS video from Michael Moore! Note, sodomy laws have since been overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Fox News…not all bad July 22, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Gay Rights.
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Now here’s a video of a Fox News anchor interviewing Shirey Phelps Roper (from the crazy Westboro Baptist Church headed by Fred Phelps).

Excerpt from lecture by Dr. John Corvino July 20, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Uncategorized.
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From the lectured entitled, “What’s Morally Wrong with Homosexuality”. (Don’t worry, it points out the flaws of homophobic thinking) Read more about Dr. John Corvino by clicking here

Letter to Dad July 19, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Coming Out, Family.
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[Author’s note: This letter was never sent. It has been sitting in my desk drawer for two years.]

Dear Dad,

I know that you don’t want to hear this, but it’s something I have to get off my chest. I think about you a lot, and every time I do, I am reduced to tears.

We live on separate coasts, living lives that make us both happy. Every week that I call you, I hesitate to pick up the phone. It kills me to have to talk to you about the weather and the news when there are so many other things going on in my life. I want to tell you that it’s my partner’s and my anniversary in a few weeks. I want to tell you that I just joined an anti-hate campaign. I want to tell the reason that I have to cut the conversation short is because I am headed out to my lesbian reading group. I can never tell you any of those things. You know I am a lesbian. You know that I consider myself married to Julie. But we can’t talk about it without you saying mean things and me hanging up the phone and crying. I often wonder why we talk at all. It seems that the only reason we talk is because I am your daughter and you are my father.

I tried so many times to talk to you about my life. Remember the time I told you that Julie was considering getting pregnant? You said to me, “A pregnant lesbian? That’s an oxymoron! There’s no such thing as a pregnant lesbian. It’s against God!” I hung up the phone and cried for hours. Do you remember all of the times you reduced me to tears with your lectures about being gay? After years and years of insults, I decided it was best not to mention the words “gay” and “lesbian” around you. Now we talk once a week and we talk about the weather and the news. I only allow myself to mention Julie casually. I can tell you that Julie and I are going grocery shopping, but I can’t tell you that we are renewing our wedding vows.

This pretending has driven me further away from you than you could ever imagine. I love you tremendously for who you are yet you cannot offer the same to me. Sometimes I lie in bed at night and think about the good old days. I remember all of the fun we used to have together. I think about the walks through Metcalf Park [in Providence, R.I.], the trips to Rocky Point and the joy of simply having you as my father. You really did your best to be a great father. I looked forward to my weekends with you after you and Mom divorced. Then, in high school I came to live with you, and that’s when things went sour. Things went downhill when I became an individual. If you ever wonder why I ran away from home, it wasn’t because I was a hormonal teen-ager.

You didn’t like it that I was a lesbian. I bet you can’t even count how many times I felt so hopeless because of your words. You never laid a hand on me, but your words were enough to put me in the hospital. I am proud to say that I have since grown into the person who I wanted to be. I grew from teen-ager to adult very fast, and I suppose I have you to thank for that. If it wasn’t for you I wouldn’t have run away from home and followed the path to my destiny. I am 26 years old. I live in a beautiful house in California with Julie, with whom I intend to spend the rest of my life. I can be my own person, which you never wanted me to be.

Do you know what hurts me the most? I may not see you for years. It is a 7.5-hour flight, and Christmas would be the time that I would usually visit. I know that it is not an option for me to show up for Christmas dinner with Julie, and I refuse to have her sit in a hotel while I visit my family. As much as it hurts that I might not see you for a long time, I will never again compromise who I am. Do you know that we plan to have a baby next year? I will never ever put my child in a position to be shamed, and if that means not seeing you for 20 years, then that is what I have to do.

I love you more than I can explain, and it hurts me so deeply that you probably will go to your grave without ever knowing who I am. All I ever wanted was for you to know who I am and love me for it. I only asked for unconditional love, nothing else. I would like nothing so much in the world as to have you love both Julie and me as much as I, your daughter, love you. What tears me apart is the fact that I don’t ever see this happening.

If I have learned anything from this, I have learned to love someone regardless of how he has hurt me. I will never stop loving you and not a week will go by that I don’t think about the good old days between us. If you could only open up your mind and heart, we could return to those good old days again.

I understand that you were raised in a different generation. I understand that you probably listen to what bigots say about homosexuality. I understand that you are the way you are because of the way that you were raised, the social circle you have and your own personal beliefs. I also understand the true meaning of unconditional love, which is something you don’t have for me. I promise that I will raise my own child with unconditional love so that she or he will never have to suffer this awful feeling that I have.

Love, Michelle

April 8, 2002

*This letter is from the Human Rights Campaign website on “Coming out Day”. It is not a submission.

Launch Day for Voice Your Pride! July 17, 2006

Posted by voiceyourpride in Misc..
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Welcome to Voice of Pride! This website chronicles stories of LGBT highschool, college, and post-college students and their supporters. Each day, a story, writing or even a poem will be posted.

We ask YOU to submit your story! To submit, send your story to voiceyourpride@gmail.com. Submissions must be related to your experience in the LGBT community. For example, a coming out story, a problem at school, your first time at a pride celebration, etc. Please specify if you would like to remain anonymous or not.

Voice of Pride is the sister site of the Facebook group, “Human Rights Campaign, Global“. Join today if you’re a part of the Facebook community!

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